The Legacy of St. Thomas – Br. Curtis Almquist

curtis4John 20:19-31

The apostle Thomas has been branded “Doubting Thomas,” but that’s unfair, and it’s inaccurate.  The opposite is true.  There are two scenes in the Gospel prior to what we’ve just heard that shed light on the apostle Thomas.  One scene is when Jesus was trying to say “good-bye” to his disciples, just prior to his being seized in the garden at Gethsemane.  Jesus said, “Let not your hearts be troubled….  I go to prepare a place for you… and you know where I am going….”   No.  Not so.  Not at least for Thomas.  It seems only Thomas has the courage to admit that he is clueless.  “My Lord,” Thomas says, “We don’t have the slightest idea where you are going!  How can we know the way?” (1) (It’s a good question; an honest question for us, too.  How can we know the way, especially when the path is dark and the risks are many, and the fear is great, and the route is unsure?)  “How can we know the way?”  Quite. Continue reading

Images from Resurrection Sunday 2014

Images from the Great Vigil of Easter 2014

Martyrdom of Stephen – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

geoffrey 150xPreached the Day after the Boston Marathon Bombings.

Every year it strikes me, as if for the first time.  On December 25 we celebrate the wondrous story of the birth of Jesus.  We meditate on the coming of the Prince of Peace.  We gaze adoringly at the crèche, at the Holy Family – the love between Mary and Joseph and their beloved child. Continue reading

Listen and Look While You Weep – Br. Luke Ditewig

Br. Luke DitewigBr. Luke Ditewig assures us that Jesus Christ comes; the question is not “if” but “how.”  In what “surprising yet ordinary” ways have you noticed God calling your name? How might looking for God in the ordinary make you more aware of God’s presence already taking place in your life?

This sermon is currently only available in audio format.

Joy Comes in the Morning -åÊBr. David Vryhof

David Vryhof SSJE  2010

Alleluia!  Christ is Risen!

CHRIST IS RISEN INDEED!  ALLELUIA!!

The psalmist says that “weeping may spend the night, but joy comes in the morning!” (Ps. 30:5)  And there is no more joyous morning for Christian people than this morning, the morning of Resurrection!

Through Lent and Holy Week, we have symbolically passed through a “night of weeping” in which we followed Jesus on the Way of suffering and death so that we might share with him the joy that comes on this morning!   We are disciples of this Way that he both lived and taught – the way of dying and rising.   We have identified ourselves with him, and with this Way – and we have found it to be the Way that leads to Life! Continue reading

Music and Photographs from Easter

7074228989_9f71e5257f_zClick on the links below to listen to musical selections from the Easter Vigil at the Monastery:

The Exsultet
Psalm 33:1-11
Psalm 46
Psalm 33:12-22
The Song of Moses
Psalm 122
The First Song of Isaiah
Psalm 42:1-7
Psalm 30
Psalm 98
The Litany
Jesus Christ is Risen Today

 

Click here to view a gallery of images from the Great Vigil of Easter 2012. Continue reading

The Power of God – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

7074229943_3f722071a5_zLuke 24:1-12

It’s Easter!

Today is the glorious culmination of these days of Holy Week.  Today, our Lord Jesus Christ has been raised gloriously from the dead.  Alleluia!

It was still very early in the morning, Luke tells us, with just the first streaks of dawn, when Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James and the other women, came to the tomb in order to carry out the last offices of love for their beloved Jesus, and to embalm his body with their spices.

But, to their amazement, when they got to the tomb, they found that the stone had been rolled away.  They looked inside and the body was gone. Continue reading

Alleluia – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Matthew 28:1-10

The year was 1922.  The place Kiev, in the Soviet Union.  There was to be a great anti-religious rally to be addressed by the revered Soviet politician and orator Nikolai Bukharin.  Thousands had arrived to listen to his words.  He stood up and spoke for over an hour – preaching atheism, pouring scorn on those who believed in God.  Finally he sat down, and the chairman asked if there were any questions.  There was silence.

But then, a man stood up near the back.  He was elderly, with a beard, and dressed in the robes of an Orthodox monk.  Slowly he made his way to the front, passing row upon row of people, until he reached the front, and climbed up slowly onto the stage, and turned to the silent, expectant crowd.

He raised his arms, and in a loud, confident voice cried out, “Alleluia!  Christ is Risen!”  and at once, the huge crowd rose to its feet and thundered out, “The Lord is Risen Indeed!  Alleluia!” Continue reading

Exsultet

Rejoice now, heavenly hosts and choirs of angels,
and let your trumpets shout Salvation
for the victory of our mighty King.

Rejoice and sing now, all the round earth,
bright with a glorious splendor,
for darkness has been vanquished by our eternal King. Continue reading

The Way – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

This sermon is currently available only in audio format.

Something Strange is Happening – Br. James Koester

Acts 9: 1-6 (7-20); Psalm 30; Revelation 5:11-14; John 21:1-19

“Something strange is happening.”[i] Something strange is happening. We hear those words read at the mid day service here at the monastery on Holy Saturday at the culmination of Holy Week as we sit in this bare chapel wondering what is next. We have shouted our hosannas and screamed our crucify; we have been over powered by the scent of the nard used to anoint the feet of the Lord in that home at Bethany and we have shared in the meal of bread and wine and watched as our feet have been washed; we have followed the crowd as it made its way through Jerusalem on its way to Calvary and there we watched Him die. With the disciples we saw him hastily buried by Joseph and Nicodemus. And then we waited; lost, afraid, despairing and bewildered until we heard those first alleluias on Easter Day. Yes, something strange indeed is happening. And something strange continues to happen.

First there was word from two of the Mary’s that his body was missing and then the breathless Magdalene arrived to tell us that she has seen him alive. Peter and John confirmed this strange news and it was too wild a story to take it all in when suddenly Cleopas bust into the room breathless from his six mile walk telling us that they too had seen the Lord.

Something strange is happening, and it doesn’t stop there. Silently, softly, almost without anyone noticing He came into the room and spoke words of peace. Peace. Something strange is happening. Continue reading

Easter Fire – Br. Curtis Almquist

“Look upon him and be radiant, and let not your faces be ashamed.” Psalm 34:5

At the Easter Vigil, during the pre-dawn darkness, we announce Christ’s resurrection by first kindling a New Fire, lighting the great Paschal Candle, and proclaiming repeatedly: “The light of Christ!”  “The light of Christ!”  “The light of Christ!”  Fire is a powerful symbol.  Fire provides warmth for the body and a hearth for food.  Fire provides light, and without electricity, fire and light are both alike.  In the scriptures, the symbols of fire and light are often used interchangeably.  The psalmist writes, “Your word is a lantern to my feet and a light upon my path.”[i] And, “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?”[ii] For the people of Israel during the years of Exodus, the glory of the Lord, shone in the Shekinah: a pillar of fire which guided the people by night.[iii] In the ancient Jewish Feast of Booths, a great candelabra was lighted in the Temple at Jerusalem on the first day, and there followed great processions with the faithful carrying torches in hand, not unlike what is done here and in so many places early Easter morning.  We do this in memory of God who is light, in whom there is no darkness at all.[iv] And so, it is no surprise that the long-awaited Messiah was anticipated as a light-bearer.[v] Jesus even said of himself that he is “the light of the world”: the fire of light, the fire of love.[vi] Continue reading

Easter Innocence – Br. Curtis Almquist

John 20:1-18

We have this old phrase, “misery loves company.” Peter and the Beloved Disciple were keeping company in their misery, but not for the same reasons. The Beloved Disciple was grief stricken over the horrendous crucifixion of his dearest friend, Jesus, with whom he had stayed until it was finished. Peter, on the other hand, was frightened and appalled by his own betrayal of Jesus, whom he had denied and abandoned from the bitter outset. The two disciples were together but in very different places when they hear the news from Mary Magdalene that Jesus’ body is gone. They run towards the tomb independently, no surprise. The Beloved Disciple would be ecstatic, remembering Jesus’ promise that if he were killed, he would come back to life; he would be resurrected. Peter, on the other hand, would be in agony. He, too, had heard Jesus’ prediction about his resurrection. But Jesus’ resurrection for Peter would be so very, very difficult because of his having to face Jesus. Peter would need to ask Jesus’ forgiveness… again. Not that Jesus would not forgive Peter, but that he would, as Jesus had undoubtedly forgiven him so many times before. How many times had Jesus forgiven Peter already? More than Peter could imagine.[i] You may recall Jesus had renamed Peter “his rock,” not just because he was so strong, but because he was so hard-headed.[ii] Peter here is running in very familiar territory as he races to Jesus’ tomb, only this time it’s much worse. This time, Peter has crossed a line; he now is more a follower of Judas and than Jesus.

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Holy Saturday – Liturgy of the Word – Br. Curtis Almquist

Something strange is happening—there is a great silence on earth today, a great silence and stillness.  The whole earth keeps silence because the King is asleep.  The earth trembled and is still because God has fallen asleep in the flesh and he has raised up all who have slept ever since the world began.  God has died in the flesh and hell trembles with fear.

He has gone to search for our first parent, as for a lost sheep. Greatly desiring to visit those who live in darkness and in the shadow of death, he has gone to free from sorrow the captives Adam and Eve, he who is both God and the son of Eve.  The Lord approached them bearing the cross, the weapon that had won him the victory.  At the sight of him, Adam, the first man he had created, struck his breast in terror and cried out to everyone: “My Lord be with you all.”  Christ answered him: “And with your spirit.”  He took him by the hand and raised him up, saying:  “Awake, O sleeper, and rise from the dead, and Christ will give you light.”

I am your God, who for your sake have become your son.  Out of love for you and for your descendants I now, by my own authority, command all who are held in bondage to come forth, all who are in darkness to be enlightened, all who are sleeping to arise.  I order you, O sleeper, to awake.  I did not create you to be held a prisoner in hell.  Rise from the dead, for I am the life of the dead.  Rise up, work of my hands, you who were created in my image.  Rise, let us leave this place, for you are in me and I am in you; together we form only one person and we cannot be separated.

For your sake I, your God, became your son; I, the Lord, took the form of a slave;  I, whose home is above the heavens, descended to the earth and beneath the earth.  For your sake, for the sake of man, I became like a man without help, free among the dead.  For the sake of you, who left a garden, I was betrayed to the Jews in a garden, and I was crucified in a garden.

See on my face the spittle I received in order to restore to you the life I once breathed to you.  See there the marks of the blows I received in order to refashion your warped nature in my image.  On my back see the marks of the scourging I endured to remove the burden of sin that weighs upon your back.  See my hands, nailed firmly to a tree, for you who once wickedly stretched out your hand to a tree.

I slept on the cross and a sword pierced my side for you who slept in paradise and brought forth Eve from your side.  My side has healed the pain in yours.  My sleep will rouse you from your sleep in hell.  The sword that pierced me has sheathed the sword that was turned against you.

Rise, let us leave this place.  The enemy led you out of the earthly paradise.  I will not restore you to that paradise, but I will enthrone you in heaven.  I forbade you the tree that was only a symbol of life, but see, I who am life itself am now one with you.  I appointed cherubim to guard you as slaves are guarded, but now I make them worship you as God.  The throne formed by cherubim awaits you, its bearers swift and eager.  The bridal chamber is adorned, the banquet is ready, the eternal dwelling places are prepared, the treasure houses of all good things lie open.  The kingdom of heaven has been prepared for you from all eternity.

Believe – Br. David Vryhof

Eastertide Preaching Series: A World Turned Upside Down

Acts 2:29-42 (or 49)
Psalm 34
John 20:24-31

This is the final sermon in a five-part series we have offered here at the monastery during Eastertide.  Throughout this series, we have sought to offer hope by examining the experience of resurrection in the early Christian community, as recorded in the book of the Acts of the Apostles, and by applying its lessons to our own time.  Each sermon has focused on a key word.  Tonight the key word is “believe.”

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Moon Gazing – Br. James Koester

Eastertide Preaching Series: A World Turned Upside Down

We continue tonight our five part sermon series entitled “A World Turned Upside-down” in which each week a different brother looks at the mystery of the resurrection through the lens of a single word or image and how that word, like the preaching of the apostle Paul and his companion Silas in Thessalonica has the effect of turning our own world upside down. But before I get there I want to do something else.

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Tea, Cookies and Resurrection – Br. Mark Brown

Eastertide Preaching Series: A World Turned Upside Down

We continue this evening with our series “A World Turned Upside Down”—a series inspired by an uproar in the city of Thessalonica nearly 2000 years ago. The Book of Acts tells how Christians were accused of turning the world upside down with their witness to the resurrection.

The resurrection of Jesus was indeed the galvanizing experience of the first Christians. And it has been at the core of the Church’s proclamation down through the ages.  But, as Br. Geoffrey so eloquently pointed out last week, resurrection is not only for that great day when we awaken to life in heaven; resurrection life is here and now.

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Life – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Eastertide Preaching Series: A World Turned Upside Down

Jesus said, “I came that you may have life, and have it abundantly.” (John 10:10)

During these weeks of Eastertide, on these Tuesday evenings, we are preaching on what it was which ‘turned the world upside down’ at Easter. For me, the good news of Easter can be summed up in one word, and that word is ‘Life. Jesus came that we may have life. Because of the death and resurrection of Jesus, we have been given the gift of life – eternal life.

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The Feast of Saint John the Evangelist, the Beloved Disciple

Preached by the Rt. Rev. Arthur E. Walmsley

“God is what we have not yet understood, the sign of a strange and unpredictable future.”
– Rowan Williams

We begin in the ancient world. Go not to Jerusalem, but Athens. The 5th century BCE was the Golden Age of the Athenian democracy. The Athens city-state created a unique version of governance by the citizenry. Its high point was reached during the leadership of Pericles from 449-431, during which the great buildings on the Acropolis were constructed.

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