Listening for Jesus – Br. James Koester

Br. James Koester

Acts 2: 42 – 47
Psalm 23
1 Peter 2: 19 – 25
John 10: 1 – 10

Finally the phone call came, and I went down to the post office to pick up my parcel. On this particular day the woman ahead of me in the line was picking up her package of bees. I’d seen them as I came into the post office. They were sitting, by themselves, on the loading dock. The postal workers won’t let them inside the building. They don’t like having to deliver bees, but the postal regulations require them to do so. My package on the other hand was sitting in the corner, near the counter. I knew it was mine because I could hear the goslings inside, honking away.

As incredible as it seems my four goslings had hatched on a Monday. They had been sexed, packed and shipped from Oklahoma before the end of that day, and there I was, picking them up in West Newbury on Wednesday. They came in a box about the size of a clementine orange box with a bit of straw and a heat pad. I put them in the car and drove them home, talking to them the whole way. When I got them home, I carefully opened the box and picked them up one at a time as I gave them something to drink. Having done that I was able to install them in their goose coop. Continue reading

Sermons for the Beach: Listening to God

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During the month of August, while the Chapel is closed, we are reposting sermons that we hope will inspire you to embrace play, silence, solitude, and recreation. 

Br. David Vryhof“Speak, Lord, for your servant is listening.” (I Samuel 3:10)

I once had a deaf friend, an earnest Christian, who asked me whether hearing people could hear God’s voice as clearly as they could hear one another’s voices. He had often observed hear­ing people responding to one another’s voices, mysteriously communicating meaning to one an­other through the movements of their jaws and lips, and understanding one another even when they weren’t look­ing at each other, or when the speaker was in another room. He had learned that they pos­sessed a mysterious ability that he had never had, and now he wondered if the same ability that enabled them to communicate with one another even when sep­arated by a wall or a door enabled them also to com­­­municate with God. “Does God talk to you?” he asked; “Can you hear God?” Continue reading

Marks of Love (Where Nails Have Been): Reflecting on the Third Mark of Mission – Br. Keith Nelson

Br. Keith Nelson

John 13:31-35

Throughout Lent and Easter tide this year, I’ve been praying with literature devoted to the Five Wounds of Christ. The meditative remembrance of Christ’s Passion was a profoundly meaningful practice in the spiritual lives of Medieval Christians, especially in England, and by the fourteenth century the visions and writings of saints steeped in such meditation concentrated with special intensity on the Five Wounds inflicted upon Christ’s Body: the nail holes in his right and left wrists, both of his feet, and the spear-wound in his side. These holy men and women saw the wounds of Jesus not as repugnant scars but as precious insignia testifying to the depths of God’s Love,as floodgates of Christ’s healing lifeblood, and as portals into the mysteries of Heaven. The seeds of such imagery are found in the Resurrection appearances in the gospels of Luke and John. When Jesus appears in the upper room, the disciple’s natural response is shock and fear, confusion and disbelief. Amid this rush of complex emotions, these distinctive marks clarify their vision and melt their hearts as they recognize the impossible: this is their Teacher, Friend, and Lord, crucified-and-risen. Continue reading

Tues Maria – Br. Mark Brown

Br. Mark Brown

1 Kings 3:3-14
Psalm 119:9-16
Mark 6:30-34

It is night at Gibeon and King Solomon dreams. In the inner world of the dreamscape, images and words get put together in ways that may not make sense in ordinary waking consciousness.

The human heart, for example, doesn’t really have ears, except that it might in dreams or in Salvador Dali paintings.  In Solomon’s dream he asks God for “a listening heart,” a “lev shomeah” in Hebrew. Our translation offers a rather prosaic distortion of this very poetic image: rather than “listening heart”, we heard “understanding mind”.  Which is not a bad thing to desire, but what Solomon asks for is a “listening heart”. Continue reading

Listening to God – Br. David Vryhof

Br. David Vryhof“Speak, Lord, for your servant is listening.”

I Samuel 3:10

I once had a deaf friend, an earnest Christian, who asked me whether hearing people could hear God’s voice as clearly as they could hear one another’s voices. He had often observed hear­ing people responding to one another’s voices, mysteriously communicating meaning to one an­other through the movements of their jaws and lips, and understanding one another even when they weren’t look­ing at each other, or when the speaker was in another room. He had learned that they pos­sessed a mysterious ability that he had never had, and now he wondered if the same ability that enabled them to communicate with one another even when sep­arated by a wall or a door enabled them also to com­­­municate with God. “Does God talk to you?” he asked; “Can you hear God?” Continue reading

Hear My Voice – Br. Luke Ditewig

John 10:22-30

Jesus says in our gospel text: “My sheep hear my voice.” They hear my voice. They are listening to me. The greatest prayer in Judaism begins: “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One.” This prayer is called the shema, from the first word “hear” or “listen.” This is the central prayer repeated over and over through life and the first one children are taught. When people asked Jesus what is the most important commandment, he quoted the shema: “Hear, O Israel” That’s number one, the most important thing to do: listen.

God continually invites people to listen through the Bible. The prophets call: “Listen to me, my people” (Isaiah 51). The psalmist cries, “Hear, O my people … oh, that you would listen to me.” (Psalm 81) Trouble comes when people do not listen to God. Blessing and healing occurs when they do listen, for listening is the beginning of conversion.  Continue reading

Wisdom and Mercy – Br. Luke Ditewig

Br. Luke DitewigToday we remember Seraphim, a Russian monk who, after making vows and being ordained a priest, lived as a hermit much like the desert fathers. Word spread about him. People visited, and he received them with much charity. People remember Seraphim for listening well and sharing wisdom.

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