Rock of Ages – Br. Jim Woodrum

Br. Jim Woodrum

Mark 8:27-33

As you can tell from the name of our Society, we brothers have a special affinity to the beloved disciple which tradition suggests is John.  There is an icon in the statio that you pass on your way into the cloister that contains the tender image of the beloved disciple reclining on the breast of Jesus.  He was closest to Jesus in his inner circle of friends.  But if truth be told, most days I identify more with Peter.  You may remember in Matthew’s gospel that Simon is renamed by Jesus and given the name Peter which means rock, “and on this rock,” Jesus tells him, “I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.”[i]

But it is not this aspect of Peter that I identify with.  It is because more often than not gets it wrong.  Peter is constantly saying the wrong things and sticking his foot in his mouth.  It is Peter who steps outside the boat to walk with Jesus on the water but is overcome by his fear and begins to sink.[ii]  It is Peter who denies Jesus three times before the cock crows after his insistence that he would never leave Jesus.[iii]  The many stories we hear about Peter suggests that he does not have all the information he needs and often acts or speaks out of ignorance.  Continue reading

Jesus’ Baptism; Our Mission – Br. Curtis Almquist

Br. Curtis Almquist

Isaiah 42:1-9
Matthew 3:13-17

The first lesson appointed for today, the reading we heard from the Prophecy of Isaiah, begins with the words: “Here is my servant; …I have put my spirit upon him; he will bring forth justice to the nations.”[i]  Now this reading is like a supernatural transcription of what the prophet Isaiah heard from God: God’s spirit being promised to the long-awaited Messiah, and also, God’s spirit reaching to foreign nations and distant lands, to the gôyîm, the non-Jews, people like many of us.  How will we know?  What will be the evidence of God’s spirit at work?  What will be the outward sign, the fruit of God’s spirit among us?  Justice.  Justice to the nations.  These opening words of Isaiah, God’s prophet, about the forthcoming Messiah, and then, later,when Jesus, the Messiah, begins his ministry, his opening words are about justice.[ii] Continue reading

Unexpected Jesus – Br. Luke Ditewig

adventword_startIf you ever feel confused by Jesus, know you’re in good company! In this Advent sermon, Br. Luke Ditewig celebrates the unexpected ways that Jesus has always come and continues to come to those who follow him. “The season of Advent invites us to look and listen for Jesus. Look and listen for the unexpected. It’s ok and normal to be confused.”

For my first two years here in SSJE, I was the only new man, the sole postulant and then novice with professed brothers.  Those were very good and relatively easy first years for me. I enjoyed using my gifts and learning our ways.  After two years, our prayers for new men were answered as Jim and John arrived and several more since.

I had not wanted to be the only new man. There was a clear call to come when I did. Before Jim and John arrived, I was fairly comfortable with my experience and perspective of SSJE. New men challenged that. I felt confused, lost—yet with time, more alive—as their presence and relationship further revealed my limitations. Their perspectives broadened my understanding of the community and more importantly challenged me to see and honestly share more of myself. Continue reading

On This Mountain – Br. David Vryhof

davidv150x150What comes to mind when you listen to Matthew’s introduction to this story of Jesus healing and feeding the multitudes?   We read, “After Jesus had left that place, he passed along the Sea of Galilee, and he went up the mountain, where he sat down.”  Do those words remind you of anything?

If you recalled the Sermon on the Mount you’d be correct.  Earlier in his gospel story, Matthew tells us that Jesus “went up the mountain” and sat down and began to teach his disciples and the crowds that followed him (5:1).  In that instance, Jesus was revealing God’s will through his words; here, Jesus reveals God’s power through his deeds.[i]    “Great crowds came to him,” the gospel writer tells us, “bringing with them the lame, the maimed, the blind, the mute, and many others… and he cured them…”  The story then goes on to tell us of how Jesus – moved with compassion for the crowds – feeds them with loaves and fishes – an abundant feast, with baskets of food left over.  The location – on the mountain – is significant.  It is a place associated with God.  It is a place of revelation, of encounter with God.  It is also a location associated in the minds of the Hebrews with the coming of the Messiah. Continue reading