Cut it Out – Br. Curtis Almquist

Br. Curtis Almquist

Preached at Yale Divinity School

…If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life maimed than to have two hands and to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire. And if your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life lame than to have two feet and to be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to stumble, tear it out; it is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than to have two eyes and to be thrown into hell, where their worm never dies, and the fire is never quenched… (Mark 9:42-50)

Don’t do this.  Don’t take Jesus literally – plucking out your eye or cutting off your hand.  You take this literally, you won’t finish the term.  But do take Jesus seriously.  This is hyperbole.  My little sister used to say this same thing to me when I was acting out, when I had tried her patience to the extreme.  She would say, “Curtis, cut it out!”  She got my attention.

So I’ll rephrase Jesus’ point in the form of a question to you.  What needs to go, stop, end, change in your life?  What do you need to cut out or cut off? Continue reading

You Don’t Need More: The Grace of Contentment

P1270753An ancient monastic principle about inner freedom: freedom to be fully alive is found in the context of limitation. This is quite counter-cultural. In western society we are identified as “consumers” in a market economy that is constantly alluring us with dissatisfaction, where what is next or what is new is promised to be better than what is now. We hear the pitch, “You can have it all … and you should,” as if more is more and never enough. Monastic wisdom counters this delusion with the elixir of “contentment,” a word which comes to us from the Latin contentus: to be satisfied or contained. Less is more. The grace of contentment presumes that what is, is enough.  Continue reading

Time: Redeeming the Gift – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

SSJE144We are probably more aware than any previous generation of how we have polluted and exploited our beautiful planet. Every day, the news brings fresh evidence of the ravages humans have exacted upon the spaces we inhabit. We recognize now that we are in the midst of an ecological crisis.

What we are, perhaps, slower to recognize is that our ecological crisis also reflects a theological crisis. The earth we have polluted is none other than God’s creation. The Book of Genesis expresses in unforgettable language the great act of creation: With power and love, God brings forth dry land from the watery void, and in successive stages creates a wondrous world filled with every kind of plant and animal, and at creation’s climax, makes humankind. To these humans is entrusted the incalculably important task of caring for this dazzlingly complex and precious work of God. “Let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.”(1) Continue reading