Look to the Glory – Br. James Koester

Br. James Koester

Acts 1: 6 – 14
Psalm 68: 1 – 10, 33 – 36
1 Peter 4: 12 – 16, 5: 6 – 11
John 17: 1 – 11

I am not naturally inclined to poetry. It’s not something I read a great deal of. I don’t spend my time reading the great poets or memorizing poems. When I was in Grade Eleven, we were given a choice of a number of options to choose from in our English literature class. One option was Canadian Literature. The other option was poetry. I of course, signed up for the Canadian Literature section. The problem was, so too did a number of my classmates. The end result was that I, and several others, were simply reassigned to the poetry section in order to even out the class sizes. I remember distinctly that one of the assignments of this class was to write five poems during the course of the term. I wrote my first poem at the end of the first class and handed it in. I still remember it:

O God, why me?
I chose Can Lit,
But got stuck in poetry.
O sh….

Well, you get the idea. Continue reading

Sermon for Saturday in Advent 2 – Br. David Allen

davidallen_1

Mt. 17:9-13

Last week I had been thinking ahead about today’s sermon. One night I dreamed that I was working on this sermon.  In that dream I was told that I would find the message that I should preach at the end of the Gospel reading, and that it would be about light, or enlightenment. The next day I read through the Gospel for today and found that the last verse of today’s Gospel could be seen as an example of the enlightening of the 3 Disciples with Jesus, Peter, James, and John. 

They had been enlightened by the Holy Spirit and brought to understand that John the Baptist fulfilled the promised appearance of Elijah to come again. (v. 10-13)      Continue reading

Interrupted on the Road Home – Br. Keith Nelson

Br. Keith Nelson

Feast of St. Philip, Deacon and Evangelist
Acts 8:26-40

It was a dark, cold, and snowy night in March of 2009.I had missed the highly erratic number 86 Bus by 5 minutes. The walk from the Sullivan Square train station in Somerville to my apartment was about 1.5 miles, a twenty minute schlep in my snow boots. Though I didn’t relish the prospect of a poorly lit walk through a fairly unpleasant neighborhood at that hour, my feet seemed to make the decision for me. My hand groped in my coat pocket for my prayer rope, as my mind groped for the familiar repetition, Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me.

It was a difficult period in my life. There were many moments when the anxiety of daily existence felt overwhelming. I was only partially employed; a number of friends had recently moved away; my apartment was cold and dilapidated; I was searching for direction and purpose. Beneath the surface of it all, in my quiet moments, the anxiety of existence itself stared back at me, sharp and real. Most days, prayer preserved my sanity. But on days like this one, brow furrowed, teeth clenched, heels pounding the frosty pavement, prayer felt like firing a nail gun into an empty sky. Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me. Three-hundred nails, on average, from the train station to my doorstep. Continue reading

A Shady Principle Is Brought to Light – Br. Curtis Almquist

Br. Curtis Almquist

Pentecost XVIII

Jesus said to the disciples,“There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was squandering his property… 29And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of dishonest wealth so that when it is gone, they may welcome you into the eternal homes…”  10 Luke 16:1-13

We could easily find this Gospel lesson appointed for today either confusing or offending.  It seems that Jesus is praising the practices of a dishonest account manager.  The manager falsifies the amounts owed to his employer so that when this manager is out of a job – mind you, he’s being fired because of his dishonesty! – these same creditors with whom he is currying illicit favor would admire him or owe him, and ultimately welcome him into their homes! Continue reading

Jesus, Learning from Shrewd Manager – Br. Curtis Almquist

curtis4

Luke 16:1-13

If you were to find this Gospel lesson appointed for today either confusing or offending, you would not be the first.  It would seem that Jesus is extolling the practices of a dishonest account manager.  So we hear, this manager falsified the amounts owed to his employer so that, when the manager was out of a job – fired because of his dishonesty! – these same people with whom he is currying illicit favor would admire him or owe him,  and ultimately welcome him into their hospitality. Continue reading

Truth – Br. David Allen


DavidA_2008_031Jn 8:31-42

Today’s Gospel tells us that Jesus told some Jews who had believed in Jesus previously, “If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples, and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” They responded, “We have never been slaves to anyone.” That was not the response that was expected. They must have been following different premises than Jesus. They must have heard something different from what Jesus had said to them.  Continue reading

A Public Relations Nightmare in Jesus’ Hometown – Br. David Vryhof

davidv150x150There are times in the gospels when it seems like Jesus is his own worst enemy.  Here he returns to his hometown, where he gets a warm reception – initially.  The gospel writer reports that “all spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his mouth” (v.22).  Then, suddenly, he seems to turn on the crowd, blasting them with words they find completely offensive, and the next thing we know, we’re reading that “all in the synagogue were filled with rage.  They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off the cliff!” (v.28-29).  How does he go from ‘warm reception’ to ‘angry mob’ in the span of a few minutes?  And why?

Continue reading

The Manifestation of Christ in the Gentiles – Br. Mark Brown

We celebrate today the great feast, the “solemnity” of the Epiphany, otherwise known as “The Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles.” “Gentiles”, meaning all the peoples of the world other than the twelve tribes of ancient Israel.  The Three Wise Men, the Magi, these emissaries from somewhere, represent the peoples of the world not of the twelve tribes.  These Wise Men led by a star discover the Creator of the stars of night.  And not in one of Herod’s sumptuous palaces, but in an unexpected place. Continue reading