The Radical Practice of Waiting – Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Br. Geoffrey Tristram

Isaiah 40:27-end
Psalm 130
Mark 4:26-32

“All good things come to those who wait!”  My mother used to say that to my brothers and sister and me when we were growing up – and I hated it!  “No, can’t I have it NOW?” – we’d plead.  “Please, can you buy me a Chelsea football shirt?”  “No, you’ll have to wait till the end of the month.”  “O no, why can’t I have it now?”

In our Western society, we hate having to wait.  At the supermarket, deciding which lane will be the shortest.  You make a choice, and it’s the wrong one.  All the other lanes are moving much faster.  Shall I swap?  If only I’d chosen the other lane: now I’ve got to wait.  Or you are driving, stopped at a red light, that’s been red for ages – and then it goes to green, and the car in front doesn’t seem to have noticed – O come on!  Or at the airport: you look at the board for your flight, and see the dreaded word ‘DELAYED.”  O no, I’ve got to wait another hour. Continue reading

Where Our Feet Are – Br. John Braught

Br. John Braught

Advent is a time of expectant waiting. We wait for the coming of the Savior, the birth of Jesus. We expect that when the Savior comes – and He will come – He will lead us in the way we should go. The prophet Isaiah reminds us, “Thus says the Lord, Your Redeemer: I am the Lord your God, who teaches you for your own good, who leads you in the way you should go.” (i) Yes, we who follow Jesus can expect Him to lead us; but first, Advent reminds us, we have to wait. We have to wait for the Savior. We have to wait before He can lead us in the way we should go. Continue reading

Waiting in Advent – Br. Curtis Almquist

The name for this season in the Church year, “Advent,” derives from the Latin, adventus, which means arrival: the arrival of the long-awaited Messiah, the Christ, whom we as Christians know as Jesus.  Meanwhile, as we anticipate this arrival, we wait.  If we were to open the Gospel accounts according to Matthew and Luke, we discover a great many people waiting for the Messiah, the Christ.  Mary is waiting.  Jo­seph is waiting.  Zechariah and Elizabeth are waiting. Symeon and Anna are wait­ing.  Most everyone, it seems, is waiting.  They’re waiting for an arrival.  There are also shepherds who are waiting. There are some sages from the east – wisemen – who are waiting.  The threatened govern­ment of Herod the Tetrarch is waiting, rather anxiously.  The only persons who are not waiting are in Bethlehem, the keepers of an inn.  And there’s no room in the inn.  They’re all full up.  It is nigh unto impossible to wait if you are full up, because waiting takes space; to be able to wait requires an emptiness.  And that’s a problem.  I think it’s problematic for many of us who live in North America. Continue reading